about mindfulness

 
 

doing less and noticing more can transform your life...

what is mindfulness?

Through regular, simple meditation practices, we can steadily build deeper awareness of how we use our time, energies and inner resources.

Ironically, by slowing down and noticing more of our experience, we can increase our efficiency and creativity.

By being more in tune with our moment-by-moment experience, we enhance our capacity to recognise unhelpful thought patterns, relate differently to endless mental chatter. Through mindful self-awareness, we can soften harsh inner rhetoric – be kinder to ourselves – and choose more skilful behaviour.

It's been said that if you practice meditation and mindfulness with any degree of seriousness it will change you, and fundamentally change how you understand yourself and experience the world.

“To see a world in a grain of sand and heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand and eternity in an hour” – William Blake

“Mindfulness is about being fully awake in our lives. It is about perceiving the exquisite vividness of each moment. We also gain immediate access to our own powerful inner resources for insight, transformation, and healing” –  Jon Kabat-Zinn

"Out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing,
there is a field. I'll meet you there" - Rumi

more about mindfulness

what are the benefits of mindfulness?
People who've done mindfulness training say that they:
  • are able to live life more fully
  • can handle their thoughts, moods and emotions with greater ease
  • are better able to relax
  • experience greater self-confidence, are less self-critical
  • have learned to manage stressful situations more effectively
  • feel more connection with themselves, more self-aware
  • experience enhanced relationships with others
  • can respond creatively to unhelpful patterns: habits of thought and behaviour 
  • have more focus, improved concentration, greater sense of purpose
  • are better able to manage chronic illness and pain
  • are more in touch with their creativity
  • have more energy and enthusiasm
  • experience greater cognitive effectiveness, enhanced working memory
  • are kinder, less judgemental, towards themselves and of others
  • are more in touch with their values, what is most important to them in life
  • have enhanced decision-making capacity
 In general, people tend to feel able to feel more at ease, less stressed, and better able to make skilful choices: more able to respond, rather than react.
how does mindfulness work?

Through engaging in systematic training and simple, regular meditation practices you can bring the effects into daily living. Once learned and assimilated, the skills are with you for the rest of your life.

However, mindfulness is not a 'quick fix' any more than therapy or counselling. It requires commitment and time.

Other questions you might have:

  • what are the benefits of mindfulness?
  • who is mindfulness for?
  • how is mindfulness learned?
  • what are the origins of mindfulness?
  • what are MBCT and MBSR?

There are also answers to frequently asked questions for you to read ...

who is mindfulness for?

Anyone willing to apply themselves consistently can benefit from simple practices that deepen their effectiveness through sustained daily application. Whether you have previous meditation experience isn’t important.

Mindfulness training is increasingly applied to specific situations, such as the management of anxiety, depression, chronic pain and illness, stress and addictive behaviours. The benefits of mindfulness are, however, more far-reaching and profound: enabling us to be more in touch with ourselves, with our potential to live rich and fulfilling lives – more open to new possibilities.

Mindfulness has been taught over the past forty years with great effect in schools, corporate contexts, the judicial system and governmental organisations including the UK Houses of Parliament.

I hope you now have a sense of whether you might benefit from mindfulness. If you are ready to explore mindfulness first-hand and see how it might become part of your life, do look at mindfulness courses and mindfulness days in London.

Other questions you might have:

  • what are the benefits of mindfulness?
  • how does mindfulness work?
  • how is mindfulness learned?
  • what are the origins of mindfulness-based approaches?
  • what are MBCT and MBSR?

And if you have further questions, do take a look at answers to frequently asked questions ... 

how is mindfulness learned?

You might say mindfulness is caught – through practice – rather than taught.

It’s usually offered as short courses for small groups (typically 8 or 9 weeks) of Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT), or Mindfulness-Based Stress reduction (MBSR) which are very similar. I am trained and experienced in both.

You’ll be introduced to simple meditation practices and mindfulness exercises to do in your own time. 

Home practice between classes is a significant part of the training: following guided meditations and integrating mindfulness practice into everyday activities.

I often say that Mindfulness for Healthy Living courses are 9 weeks' home practice, supported by weekly classes: it's important that you can commit to both, as well as a practice day (Saturday or Sunday) part way through the course.

The approach can also be incorporated into individual counselling and psychotherapy: implicitly and explicitly. It can be offered one-to-one over the phone, although in my experience there are considerable benefits in mindfulness being taught in a group context.

And If you are a therapist, counsellor or health professional who brings mindfulness into your work, you might be interested in joining the monthly group I facilitate.

I hope this gives you a sense of how mindfulness skills are developed, and given you an interest in bringing mindfulness into your life – perhaps through a mindfulness course or mindfulness day in London.

Other questions you might have:

  • what are the benefits of mindfulness?
  • how does mindfulness work?
  • who is mindfulness for?
  • what are the origins of mindfulness based approaches?
  • what are MBCT and MBSR?

Or read answers to frequently asked questions ...

what are the origins of mindfulness?

roots, modern applications, current evidence-based research

There’s a continuous tradition of mindfulness going back thousands of years. Mindfulness itself has no cultural or religious connotations. Entirely secular in content and style – yet coming straight from basic Buddhist principles – the effectiveness of mindfulness is explained by contemporary neurological research, and validated by NICE: the National Institute for Clinical Excellence.

In the 1970s Jon Kabat-Zinn, professor of molecular biology and experienced meditation and yoga practitioner, developed the 8-week Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) course at the University of Massachusetts Medical Centre.

Inspired by this ground-breaking work, research scientists Professor Mark Williams, Dr John Teasdale and Professor Zindel Segal developed Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for the prevention of relapse of depression. This is now a treatment of choice for many people, and recognised as such by many in the medical profession.

Other approaches, closely based on these two models, have evolved through research and practice. Collectively known as mindfulness-based approaches, these are increasingly available as aspects of integrative medicine in public, voluntary and independent settings. Courses aimed specifically at managing chronic pain, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS/ME), as well as preventing addiction relapse and managing some forms of serious mental illness, have been developed through extensive trials and research.

Developmental work and research continues in clinical settings and universities in the UK and internationally – including notably the Centre for Mindfulness Research and Practice (CMRP), University of Bangor, and at Oxford and Exeter universities.

The approach I generally offer closely adheres to the MBCT model. I am also trained and experienced in MBSR and the Breathworks programme for chronic pain and illness.

In my experience of teaching hundreds of people over many years, people benefit from this approach irrespective of whether they have experienced episodes of depression in the past: the skills offered are applicable to all aspects of daily life and our responses to it.

I hope this has given you a brief introduction to the origins of mindfulness-based approaches. If you're curious to know more, there are additional sources of information on my resources page.

Other questions you might have: 

  • what are the benefits of mindfulness?
  • how does mindfulness work?
  • who is mindfulness for?
  • how is mindfulness learned?
  • what are MBCT and MBSR?

If you're ready to explore mindfulness and discover first-hand how you can bring it into your life, take a look at mindfulness courses and mindfulness days in London ...

Or take a look at answers to frequently asked questions.

MBCT and MBSR
There are various mindfulness-based approaches, most commonly MBCT (Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy) and MBSR (Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction), which have strong similarities. Generally speaking, it’s not necessary to appreciate the comparatively minor differences between them.
However, if you specifically want to do a Mindfulness course with others working with the same issues as you – for instance chronic pain an illness – you might want to find a specialist course. 

The approach I generally offer closely adheres to the MBCT model. I am also trained and experienced in MBSR and the Breathworks programme for chronic pain and illness. In my experience of teaching hundreds of people over many years, people benefit from this approach irrespective of whether they have experienced episodes of depression in the past: the skills offered are applicable to all aspects of daily life and our responses to it.

I hope this has given you a brief introduction to the origins of mindfulness-based approaches. If you're curious to know more, there are additional sources of information on my resources page.

Other questions you might have:

  • what are the benefits of mindfulness?
  • how does mindfulness work?
  • who is mindfulness for?
  • how is mindfulness learned?
  • what are the origins of mindfulness?

If you are ready to explore mindfulness and discover first-hand how you can bring it into your life, take a look at mindfulness courses and mindfulness days in London.

Or take a look at answers to frequently asked questions.

why mindfulness with Lokadhi?

I’m inspired by the capacity of mindfulness to change lives – and love sharing this so others may benefit. A long-standing meditation practice underpins my approach, as well as personal experience of how mindfulness has helped me manage my own chronic ill-health.

I know that mindfulness training is no small undertaking. People often say they appreciate the care and thought I give to creating a warm, relaxed and supportive atmosphere. There's often laughter. And there's space for quietness and reflection.

As an experienced mindfulness practitioner, and trained in teaching mindfulness to an advanced level, I’ve offered mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) courses for many years in the voluntary and public sectors. I've seen hundreds of people experience significant improvements in the quality of their lives.

As one of few to have formal training in this specialism, I also bring mindfulness into counselling and therapy.

what people who've done courses with Lokadhi say ...

“It was a great course – I liked your firmness and supportiveness; the warm and caring atmosphere.”

“It was stimulating, relaxing, enjoyable and challenging. You’re an excellent facilitator – many thanks, Lokadhi.”

“I’ve benefited hugely from the kindness and insightfulness of the group – and, most especially, the group leader.”

“Nourishment from Lokadhi has been enormous. Thank you – great appreciation for a fantastic, beautiful course.”

“I’ve gained the confidence to look at things I find difficult, rather than turn away.”

"This is the most helpful course I’ve been on, which is enabling me to ‘be’ and to change my way of being in the world.”

“I so enjoyed doing this course for the second time – invaluable and unique: thank you!”

I hope I've given you some idea of what mindfulness is. To experience mindfulness for yourself, you could book on a mindfulness practice day. And if you have further questions, please go to to frequently asked questions ...